Tuesday, February 22, 2011

"Free" throws & CMU rankings down the stretch


With an RPI of 311 (out of 345 teams) CMU isn't exactly striking fear in the hearts of its opponents. Here's how the Chippewas rank in major statistical categories, updated after their embarrassing loss at Niagara:

CategoryStatMAC rankNtnl rank
Pts/gm59.011336
Opp pts/gm64.73T-77
Scoring mgn-5.711290
FG%38.412333
FT%61.812332
3PM12710312
3P%32.511T-257
Reb/gm33.510T-251
Opp reb/gm34.25T-168
Reb mgn.-0.77210
Blocks/gm3.54T-4T-145
Assists/gm8.7412345
Steals/gm7.125T-105
TO margin+1.125108
Ast/TO0.6312T-337
Hm att./gm2,5327N/A

Free-throw woes (again)


TeamFT%MAC rec.
1. Miami73.69-3
2. Akron71.77-5
3. WMU71.27-5
4. Ohio70.46-6
5. NIU70.33-9
6. BSU69.97-5
7. Buffalo67.87-5
8. Kent St.67.19-3
9. EMU63.54-8
10. BGSU63.57-5
11. Toledo631-11
12. CMU61.85-7

CMU rank...free throws (Ernie Zeigler tenure)


YearPct.MAC rankNtl rank
2010-1161.812332
2009-1066.410T-254
2008-0963.19T-320
2007-0867.79T-212
2006-0772.51T-61

As he's got more of his guys in, the free-throw percentage has hovered around 65 percent (down to a paltry 61.8 this season.

Trey Zeigler, CMU's leading scorer, is shooting 54.2 percent from the line. That's just unacceptable. That's nearing Ben Wallace-esque numbers, and when CMU gets good (it's coming) teams may resort to "hack-a-Trey." It boggles my mind how Trey still shoots such a flat shot from the line (take a look sometime — it's like watching a car navigate across Nebraska). His jumper still is sort of a line drive, too, which is partly shown in his 40.2 percent field goal mark. Of course, he's also getting hounded by the defense most of the time, too, but still, this isn't a very good sign.

Then, there's Derek Jackson (51.2 percent), Andre Coimbra (42.9 percent), William McClure (61.5 percent), Antonio Weary (44.4 percent), and it's no wonder CMU is a bad team right now. Jalin Thomas (80.8 percent) is CMU's best shooter, but the next closest is Finis Craddock (68.2 percent). There's no player who even shoots in the 70-percent range. Baffling, indeed.

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